Click Here for Bouvsite Home Page Training Index


| Interactive Training Forum |
| Home | Frames | No Frames | Index | SiteMap | Search | New |
  My Bouvs | Health | History | Training | Art | Reading | Tails | Clowns | Grooming | Links | Find A Bouvier | Misc | Int'l |
 | Email | Guestbook | BouvLovers | Awards | Documents | Articles | Tributes | Help Me |

 

 

Please Don't Kill The Drive


By Lisa Clark
Email:  tlc1@southwind.net

 

You have a new Bouvier Puppy that you would like to title when it is old enough. Whether you are thinking about AKC obedience, conformation, working, herding and or police and narcotics work, it is important not to destroy the natural drives of the puppy. Drives that may later make a difference between and average working dog and a super working dog. " A drive is the subconscious impulse to act to stimuli" although a dog may be born with certain drives that would be necessary for survival in the wild, by making a dog conform to domestication, we humans tend to "NO" many of these drives right out of the pup. Instead of viewing a puppy's activities as actions that either please us or not, we need to look at them from the pup's point of view with our ultimate goals for the puppy in mind.

 BEFORE NO, THINK WON'T 

You may not like your puppy chewing, chasing, barking, jumping, biting etc but before you "NO" these actions

out of the pup, think about the adult dog that won't: bark at strangers, retrieve a dumbbell, recall wit speed and enthusiasm, climb a six foot wall, herd sheep or cattle, etc.. So, if you want an enthusiastic, high performance dog, there are some things you should or should not do with your puppy.

The most important piece of equipment you will ever invest in is a CRATE. It aids in housebreaking, keeps pups out of trouble and when travelling serves as the safest place for the dog, and offers the puppy it's own space. If the pup, or even an older dog, cries or throws a fit when placed in the he crate: ignore the dog. Put the create where the racked disturbs you the least and do not approach the crate until the animal is settled. Praise the animal when it is quiet.

If you are not actively watching or playing with your puppy, it should be crated or otherwise confined where it can't get into trouble. This is not jail, where the pup is thrown for punishment. If used properly, a crate becomes the puppy's place of choice, and a place where the dog's name isn't Trouble. Crate training is a natural extension of the dog's drive to have a den or shelter, as I type this y three house Bouv's are all snuggled in crates with doors open.

 KEEP DRIVES ALIVE 

Keep both the hunting and prey drive alive in the puppy. The hunting drive is the instinct to pursue or look for an abject (prey) and the prey drive is the instinct to bite or hold prey. These drives are necessary if the dog is to learn all forms of work, so encourage the puppy to chase and grab objects. If the pup is chasing something that is a "NO" object, then offer the pup something more exciting and fun to chase distraction it from the "NO" object. Praise the pup when its attentions is diverted to the "YES object. For example: if the pup bites barks or chases the vacuum - great! The dog has herding instinct, so don't kill the instinct. Instead turn the vacuum off, get a play object for the puppy, and praise him for playing with the object. If you don't want him going after the vacuum, then put the puppy in another area (crate) while you vacuum. If you don't want the puppy to jump on you, then don't teach the pup that the higher ground is desirable by picking up the puppy in your arms. Instead, kneel or sit on he floor and play with the pup at its level. This also applies to furniture. The puppy wants to be on the furniture to be with your, so get a cushion, and join the pup on the floor. This is a much better method of handling jumping than the work "NO". To stop a puppy from chewing a "NO" object, offer a "YES" object and praise the pup for choosing the "YES" object. Then put the "NO" object away. What was it doing in the puppy's range anyway?

When you are playing retrieve, and the puppy won't return the object, don't chase it. Have a second object ready. Show it to the puppy and in your best "Minnie Mouse" impersonation, talk to the puppy as you run in the opposite direction. Act excited, and praise the puppy as it turns and chases you.

Make it a point to always use high energy, lots of movement and lots of praise when paying with your puppy. Remember that your are training your pup while your are playing, all play is training. When the puppy tires, it is time to QUIT. If you can become the most exciting and fun thing in your puppy's life, everything you do with your pup is a reward to the puppy. You'll have an adult dog that shines as a performance dog because working with you is great pleasure for the dog.

SEND EMAIL


Copyright Bogart's Daddy, Inc.
Jan Rifkinson, webmaster
All rights reserved

TOP OF PAGE

| Interactive Training Forum |
| Home | Frames | No Frames | Index | SiteMap | Search | New |
  My Bouvs | Health | History | Training | Art | Reading | Tails | Clowns | Grooming | Links | Find A Bouvier | Misc | Int'l |
 | Email | Guestbook | BouvLovers | Awards | Documents | Articles | Tributes | Help Me |